CIS Senior Project

“You measure the size of the accomplishment by the obstacles you had to overcome to reach your goals.”

All fourth-year Old Colony Computer Information Technology students are required to complete a senior project before their graduation.

What is the CIS Senior Project?

The CIS Senior Project is a graduation requirement that challenges students to showcase all of the technical and communication skills they have learned in four years of high school. Students will select a technological topic that interests them and develop a thorough outline that incorporates planning, research, testing, written & verbal communication, and many other skills.

Project Overview

The 4 Ps – Paper, Product, Portfolio, Presentation:

  • Research Paper
    The 10-page research paper will document all aspects of your Senior Project. Your paper must include a cover page, outline page, and works cited page. For more information, see the Research Paper section below.
  • Technology Project
    You will spend the major portion of your time (about 4 weeks) during the 2nd trimester researching and constructing your actual technology project. Use your time wisely! Do not surf the Web, play games, or waste time on websites that don’t apply to your project research. Focus on the main idea of your project at all times.
  • Project Portfolio
    Document all sections of your Senior Project for your portfolio. We will copy your work to CD at the conclusion of the project. The daily log, 10-page paper, presentation program, and actual project will be burned to CD. This project will be a major part of your Senior Portfolio.
  • Student Presentation
    Your presentation should last approximately 7 – 10 minutes. The judges and audience will ask questions at the conclusion of your presentation. Professional dress is required. For more information, see the Presentation section below.
Technology Project

This technology project is an excellent opportunity to draw upon all of the skills you have learned in the Computer Information Technology shop over the past four years, while researching and learning new technological skills. The main focus in this phase of the Senior Project is for students to select a challenging new technology to learn and apply.

Students are urged to select technologies that they are keenly interested in and may want to pursue in their futures. This is a great chance to really study and understand an exciting technology.

Students are urged to organize their time wisely and to focus on the project at all times. This project has definite time limits, so manage your time well.

At minimum, students should conduct 60 hours of verifiable work during the research and application of the technologies they have chosen for the project. This should be achieved by working 4 periods a day in shop for 4 weeks (approximately 50 minutes per period X 4 periods a day = 200 minutes daily —– 200 minutes X 20 days = 4,000 minutes —– divided by 60 minutes in an hour = over 66 hours). Adding the first week and sixth week into consideration, students will spend approximately 100 hours on the Senior Project.

Technology Topics

There are many topics in the computer information technology field that can be chosen for your Senior Project.

The following is a sampling of some possible topics:

  • Flash Game Development
  • Complete Flash Website
  • Flash Movie (Documentary or Other Subject)
  • Digital Video Project
  • 3-D Animation Project
  • Code Website for Cell Phone
  • Website (Accessibility For Disabled)
  • Complete Marketing Plan for Company (OA)
  • Office Workflow Template (OA)
  • PHP / MySQL Project
  • Project with Database Program
  • Visual Basic Program to Solve Problem for Company
Presentation

Presenting your Senior Project to teachers, classmates, judges, and invited guests is an important part of this entire exercise. Take it seriously, prepare by writing an outline on index cards, and practice before presenting your Senior Project.

Effective public speaking and the ability to clearly articulate your ideas is a powerful skill which you will call on throughout your lifetime. Effective verbal communication is a key to success in all of the major experiences you will have – in college, your career, and in your personal life.

You may use any of the following programs for your presentation:

  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Flash
  • Code your own website

Your presentation should last approximately 7 – 10 minutes. The judges and audience will ask questions at the conclusion of your presentation.

Professional dress is required for your presentation.

Research Paper

The 10-page research paper will document all aspects of your Senior Project. Remember to copy down all of your sources as you are working on your project (for your Works Cited page). Start your paper by writing an outline page. Use proper punctuation and grammar throughout the paper and please spell-check your work.

The research paper details are as follows:

  • Cover Page
  • Table of Contents
  • Works Cited

The research paper must be:

  • Double-spaced
  • In 12-point type
  • Times New Roman font
  • Standard margins
  • Numbered pages
  • Spell-checked

Suggested outline of 10-page paper:

  • Page 1: Cover Page
    2009-2010 Senior Project, Name, Title of Project, Date
  • Page 2: Table of Contents
    List each page title and corresponding page number
  • Page 3: Summary
    Concise one-page summary of your Senior Project
  • Page 4: Reasoning / Technologies Used
    1) Origin of project idea … your reason for selecting this project … the challenges you anticipate …
    what do you hope to learn or discover?
    2)What technologies do you plan to use during this project? What new technologies will you learn?
  • Pages 5-8: Research & Project Work
    Discuss the entire process of your project … how did your research go? … what did you learn? …
    what problems did you run into? … what breakthroughs did you have? … what was the hardest aspect of the project?
  • Page 9: Results / Reflection
    What was the final result of the project? … was it successful? … did the project meet your expectations? … what did you learn from the project? … Wrap up the paper with your personal reflection on your Senior Project
  • Page 10: Works Cited
    List website URLs, books, DVDs, articles, magazines, tutorials, etc.
Senior Project FAQs

What if the scope of my Senior Project is too large and complex to realistically finish in six weeks? 

Estimating the scope and time needed to complete a project is an excellent Project Management skill. Scale down the scope of projects that are too ambitious for the time allowed (4 periods a day for six weeks).
What happens if I don’t finish my Senior Project by the deadline? 
You must still present your Senior Project. All Senior Project work will be graded on the assigned deadline date.
Do I have to complete a Senior Project if I have a Co-Op job? 
No, you do not have to complete a Senior Project if you are on a Co-Op job. However, if you are still in shop waiting to go on Co-Op, you are responsible for a “scaled-down” Senior Project (your work should reflect the time spent in shop).

Can I work on my Senior Project at home? 

Students are expected to work on their Senior Project in the classroom in the Old Colony CIS shop.

You cannot tell the instructor, “I am working on my Senior Project at home.” A significant portion of your grade is based on your effort, motivation, and work ethic. Therefore, all project work must be done during the alloted CIS shop time.

What happens if many websites I need for research are blocked and unavailable? 

Students can write a list of blocked URLs (if the websites are acceptable according to school policy) and request that certain URLs be unblocked on a temporary basis. Students can also save acceptable research or project materials acquired on a home computer on a flash drive and ask an Old Colony instructor for permission to download the content on their shop computer.
What portion of my trimester shop grade will the Senior Project be? 
The Senior Project will account for 50% of your trimester shop grade. You will work on the Senior Project for 4 periods a day during the trimester.

 

Senior Project Grading Rubrics

Product Rubric

Element Exceeds
4
Meets
3
Below
2
Little/No
1
A: Originality/
Creativity
Product shows a large amount of original thought. Ideas are creative and inventive. Extremely clever an unique approach to product. Product shows some original thought. Work shows new ideas and insights Clever at times, thoughtful and uniquely developed. Uses other people’s ideas (giving them credit), but there is little evidence of original thinking. A few original touches to enhance product. Uses other people’s ideas, but does not give them credit. Little creative thought evidence.
B: Copyright followed/
permissions received
All permissions to use materials and/or copyright limits followed. Most permissions to use materials and/or copyright limits followed. Few permissions to use materials and/or copyright limits followed. No permissions to use materials and/or copyright limits followed.
C: Scope of
technology attempted
The technology attempted is extremely difficult and complicated. The technology attempted is sophisticated. The technology attempted is on par with the level of what is used in shop but the student took it to a new level. The student did not attempt a project of substantial difficulty.
D: Scope of student
achievement in
skill acquisition
Student developed sophisticated skills in the technology. Student developed strong skills in the technology. Student developed moderate skills in the technology. Student developed limited skills in the technology.
E: Technology product
soundness (working
the way it should)
The student incorporated multiple aspects of the technology and they all work correctly. The student incorporated multiple aspects of the technology and most work correctly. The student incorporated few aspects of the technology and all work correctly or incorporated many and few work. The student incorporated just a few aspects of the technology and they do not all work.
F: Project goal achievement Student exceeded their goal. Student met their goal. Student achieved portions of their goal. Student did not achieve goal.

Research Paper Rubric

Element Exceeds
4
Meets
3
Below
2
Little/No
1
Research & Writing
A: The report demonstrates a full understanding of the research. Student demonstrates full knowledge with explanations and elaborations. Student demonstrates understanding of information, but fails to elaborate. Student does not demonstrate full understanding of information. Student does not have grasp of information.
B: The report reflects accurate, specific, purposeful information that fully explains the topic. Topic is fully explained by accurate and pertinent information with no extraneous information. Topic is explained by the project. Topic is partially explained by the project. Topic is not explained and may have inaccurate information.
C: The written paper’s key points are presented in an engaging and organized manner. Student presents information in logical, interesting sequence which judges can follow. Student presents information in logical sequence, which judges can follow. Judges have difficulty following presentation, because student jumps around. Judges cannot understand presentation, because there is no sequence of information.
D: Vocabulary effectively explains the topic. Vocabulary fully explains and elaborates the topic. Vocabulary explains the project. Vocabulary partially explains the topic. Vocabulary does not display an understanding of the topic.
E: Written content follows rules of grammar, usage, punctuation and spelling conventions. Presentation has no misspellings or grammatical errors. Presentation has no more than two misspellings and/or grammatical errors. Presentation has three misspellings and/or grammatical errors. Presentations had four or more spelling errors and/or grammatical errors.
F: MLA citations correct. Citations have no errors. Citations have no more than two errors. Citations have three errors. Citations have more than four errors.
G: Follows designated topics for 10-page paper (Summary, Reasoning, Technologies, Research, Results, & Reflection). All page topics thoroughly covered. Most topics covered well. One page topic missing. Some topics covered well. Two page topics missing. Topics not covered well. Three page topics missing.
H: Follows formatting instructions (Double-spaced, 12-point type, Times New Roman font, & standard margins). All formatting instructions followed. No more than two formatting errors. Three formatting errors. More than four formatting errors.

Presentation Rubric

Element Exceeds
4
Meets
3
Below
2
Little/No
1
Multimedia Presentation
A: The multimedia presentation demonstrates a full understanding of the project subject. Student demonstrates full knowledge with explanations and elaborations. Student is at ease with content, but fails to elaborate. Student is uncomfortable with information. Student does not have grasp of information.
B: Multimedia project is presented in an engaging and organized manner. Student presents information in logical, interesting sequence which judges can follow. Includes Intro and conclusion. Student presents information in logical sequence, which judges can follow. Judges have difficulty following presentation, because student jumps around. Judges cannot understand presentation, because there is no sequence of information.
C: Vocabulary effectively explains the topic. Vocabulary fully explains and elaborates the topic. Vocabulary explains the project. Vocabulary partially explains the topic. Vocabulary does not display an understanding of the topic.
D: Format is well designed (use of color, graphics, moving images, titles, labels). Graphics are clear and enhance the presentation. Presentation format provides an aesthetic, visually pleasing, informative display of topic. Most of the presentation format provides an aesthetic, visually pleasing, display of topic. Some of the presentation format is unclear and does not display topic. The presentation format is distracting and detracts from the topic.
E: Multimedia project is technically correct (operates with minimal flaws during presentation). Technical presentation has no flaws and enhances topic. Technical presentation has minor flaws and enhances the topic. Technical presentation has several flaws and does not enhance the topic. Technical presentation has major flaws and is unrelated to topic.
Presentation Delivery Style
A: Speaker demonstrates effective body language. Movements seem fluid and helped the audience visualize. No distracting body language. Minor body language that is inappropriate to the presentation. Body language distracts from presentation.
B: Speaker demonstrates effective eye contact. Holds attention of  judges with the use of direct eye contact. Consistent use of direct eye contact with judges. Display minimal eye contact with judges. No eye contact with judges.
C: Voice quality is effective. Use of fluid speech and inflection maintains interest of judges. Satisfactory use of inflection, but does not consistently use fluid speech. Displays some level of inflection throughout delivery. Consistently uses a monotone voice.
D: Confidence and knowledge of content is evident. Student displays relaxed self-confident nature about self with no mistakes. Makes minor mistakes, but quickly recovers from them; displays little or no tension. Displays mild tension; has trouble recovering from mistakes. Tension and nervousness are obvious; has trouble recovering from mistakes.
E: Delivery time falls within the 7-10-minute guideline. Good use of drama and student meets apportioned time interval. Delivery is patterned, but does not meet apportioned time interval. Delivery is in bursts and does not meet apportioned time interval. Delivery is either too quick or too slow to meet apportioned time interval.
F: Speaker responds well to questions. Student answers detailed questions with explanations and elaborations. Student answers detailed questions with no elaboration. Student answers only rudimentary questions. Student cannot answer questions about subject.
G : Business attire with a well-groomed and professional look. Student’s attire & grooming present a complete professional look. Student’s attire and grooming is neat. Student’s attire and/or grooming is not professional. Student was inappropriately dressed.
Citing Sources

World Wide Web site

When you document sources from the World Wide Web, the MLA suggests that your Works Cited entries contain as many items from the following list as are relevant and available:

  • Name of the author, editor, compiler, or translator (if available and relevant), alphabetized by last name and followed by any appropriate abbreviations, such as ed.
  • Title of a poem, short story, article, or other short work within a scholarly project, database, or periodical, in quotation marks
  • Title of a book, in italics or underlined
  • Name of the editor, compiler, or translator of a book (if applicable and if not cited earlier), preceded by any appropriate abbreviation, such as ed.
  • Publication information for any print version
  • Title of the scholarly project, database, periodical, or professional or personal site (in italics or underlined), or, for a professional or personal site with no title, a description such as home page
  • Name of the editor of a scholarly project or database (if known)
  • Version number (if not part of the title) or, for a journal, the volume, issue, or other identifying number
  • Date of electronic publication or posting or latest update, whichever is most recent (if known)
  • Name of any institution or organization sponsoring or associated with the Web site
  • Date you accessed the source
  • URL (in angle brackets)

Although no single entry will contain all fourteen items of information, all Works Cited entries for Web sources contain the following basic information:

  • Author’s name (last name first). Document title. Date of Internet publication. Date of access .

To see how to document specific types of Web sources, refer to the examples below:

Professional website

• The William Faulkner Society Home Page. Ed. Mortimer, Gail. 16 Sept. 1999. William Faulkner Soc. 1 Oct. 1999 <http://www.acad.swarthmore.edu/faulkner>.
• NAIC Online. 29 Sept. 1999. National Association of Inventors Corporation. 1 Oct. 1999 <http://www.better-investing.org/>.
• U. S. Department of Education (ED) Home Page. 29 Sept. 1999. US Dept. of Education. 1 Oct. 1999 <http://www.ed.gov/index.html>.
• William Faulkner on the Web 7 July 1999. U of Mississippi. 20 Sept. 1999 <http://www.mcsr.olemiss.edu/~egjbp/faulkner/ faulkner.html>.

 

Personal website

• Pellegrino, Joseph. Home page. 16 Dec. 1998. 1 Oct. 1999
< http://www.english.eku.edu /pellegrino/personal.htm>.

Book

An online book may be the electronic text of part or all of a printed book, or a book-length document available only on the Internet (e.g., a work of hyperfiction).

• Bird, Isabella L. A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountains. New York, 1881. Victorian Women Writers Project. Ed. Perry Willett. 27 May 1999. Indiana U. 4 Oct. 1999 < http://www.indiana.edu/~letrs/vwwp/ bird/rocky.html>.
• Bryant, Peter J. “The Age of Mammals.” Biodiversity and Conservation. 28 Aug. 1999. 4 Oct. 1999 <http://darwin.bio.uci.edu/ ~sustain/bio65/lec02/b65lec02.htm>.
• Harnack, Andrew, and Eugene Kleppinger. Preface. Online! A Reference Guide to Using Internet Sources. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2000. 5 Jan. 2000. <http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/ online>.

Article in an electronic journal (ejournal)

• Joyce, Michael. “On the Birthday of the Stranger (in Memory of John Hawkes).” Evergreen Review 5 Mar. 1999. 12 May 1999 <http://www.evergreenreview.com/102/evexcite/joyce/nojoyce.html>.
• Wysocki, Anne Frances. “Monitoring Order: Visual Desire, the Organization of Web Pages, and Teach the Rules of Design.” Kairos: A Journal for Teachers of Writing in Webbed Environments 3.2 (1998). 21 Oct. 1999 <http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/3.2/features/wysocki/mOrder0.html>.

Article in an electronic magazine (ezine)

• Adler, Jerry. “Ghost of Everest.” Newsweek 17 May 1999. 19 May 1999 <http://newsweek.com/nw-srv/issue/20_99a/printed/int/socu/ so0120_1.htm>.

Newspaper article

• Wren, Christopher. “A Body on Mt. Everest, a Mystery Half-Solved.” New York Times on the Web 5 May 1999. 13 May 1999 <http://search.nytimes.com/search/daily/bin/fastweb?getdoc+site+ site+87604+0+wAAA+%22a%7Ebody%7Eon%7Emt.%7Eeverest%22>.

Review

• 1. Michael Parfit, review of The Climb: Tragic Ambitions on Everest, by Anatoli Boukreev and G. Weston DeWalt, New York Times on the Web 7 Dec. 1997, 4 Oct. 1999 <http://search. nytimes.com/ books/97/12/07/reviews/971207.07parfitt.html>.

Editorial

• “Public Should Try Revised Student Achievement Test.” Editorial. Lexington Herald-Leader 13 Apr. 1999. 4 Oct. 1999 <http://www.kentuckyconnect.com/heraldleader/news/041399/ editorialdocs/413test-1.htm>.

Letter to the editor

• Gray, Jeremy. Letter. Lexington Herald-Leader. 7 May 1999. 7 May 1999 <http://www.kentuckyconnect.com/heraldleader/news/ 050799/lettersdocs/507letters.htm>.

Scholarly project or information database

• Center for Reformation and Renaissance Studies. Ed. Laura E. Hunt and William Barek. May 1998. U of Toronto. 11 May 1999 <http://CItd.SCAR.UTORONTO.CA/crrs/index.html>.
• The Internet Movie Database. May 1999. Internet Movie Database Ltd. 11 May 1999 <http://us.imdb.com>.

Short text within a larger project or database

• Whitman, Walt. “Beat! Beat! Drums!” Project Bartleby Archive. Ed. Steven Van Leeuwen. May 1998. Columbia U. 11 May 1999 <http://www.bartleby.com/142/112.html>.

Other Web sources

When documenting other Web sources-for example, an audio or film clip, a map, or a painting-provide a descriptive phrase (e.g., map) if needed.

• di Bondone, Giotto. The Morning of Christ. 1305. WebMuseum, Paris. 1 June 1999 <http://metalab.unc.edu/wm/paint/auth/ giotto/mourning-christ/mourning-christ.jpg>.
• “Methuen, Massachusetts.” Map. U.S. Gazeteer. US Census Bureau. 4 Oct. 1999 <http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/gazetteer>.

 

Source of this material:

CTE Learning that works for Massachusetts

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